lowest The Great Believers: outlet sale 2021 A Novel outlet online sale

lowest The Great Believers: outlet sale 2021 A Novel outlet online sale

lowest The Great Believers: outlet sale 2021 A Novel outlet online sale

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PULITZER PRIZE FINALIST
NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST
NEW YORK TIMES TOP 10 BOOK OF 2018
LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE WINNER
ALA CARNEGIE MEDAL WINNER
THE STONEWALL BOOK AWARD WINNER

Soon to Be a Major Television Event, optioned by Amy Poehler

“A page turner . . . An absorbing and emotionally riveting story about what it’s like to live during times of crisis.” —The New York Times Book Review
 
A dazzling novel of friendship and redemption in the face of tragedy and loss set in 1980s Chicago and contemporary Paris


In 1985, Yale Tishman, the development director for an art gallery in Chicago, is about to pull off an amazing coup, bringing in an extraordinary collection of 1920s paintings as a gift to the gallery. Yet as his career begins to flourish, the carnage of the AIDS epidemic grows around him. One by one, his friends are dying and after his friend Nico’s funeral, the virus circles closer and closer to Yale himself. Soon the only person he has left is Fiona, Nico’s little sister.

Thirty years later, Fiona is in Paris tracking down her estranged daughter who disappeared into a cult. While staying with an old friend, a famous photographer who documented the Chicago crisis, she finds herself finally grappling with the devastating ways AIDS affected her life and her relationship with her daughter. The two intertwining stories take us through the heartbreak of the eighties and the chaos of the modern world, as both Yale and Fiona struggle to find goodness in the midst of disaster.

Named a Best Book of 2018 by The New York Times Book Review, The Washington Post, NPR, San Francisco Chronicle, The Boston Globe, Entertainment Weekly, Buzzfeed, The Seattle Times, Bustle, Newsday, AM New YorkBookPageSt. Louis Post-Dispatch, Lit HubPublishers Weekly, Kirkus Reviews, New York Public Library and Chicago Public Library 

Review

"Rebecca Makkai’s  The Great Believers is a page turner... among the first novels to chronicle the AIDS epidemic from its initial outbreak to the present—among the first to convey the terrors and tragedies of the epidemic’s early years as well as its course and repercussions...An absorbing and emotionally riveting story about what it’s like to live during times of crisis." —The New York Times Book Review

“Makkai knits themes of loss, betrayal, friendship and survival into a powerful story of people struggling to keep their humanity in dire circumstances.” —People Magazine

“Cultural revolutions of the past painfully reverberate in Rebecca Makkai’s deft third novel,  The Great Believers, which captures both the devastation of the AIDS crisis in 1980s Chicago and the emotional aftershocks of those losses.” —Vogue

"A striking, emotional journey... Makkai creates a powerful, unforgettable meditation, not on death, but rather on the power and gift of life. This novel will undoubtedly touch the hearts and minds of readers.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Tearjerker…  The Great Believers asks big questions about redemption, tragedy, and connection. Makkai has written her most ambitious novel yet.” —Entertainment Weekly

The Great Believers soars…magnificent…Makkai has full command of her multi-generational perspective, and by its end,  The Great Believers offers a grand fusion of the past and the present, the public and the personal. It’s remarkably alive despite all the loss it encompasses.” —Chicago Tribune

"Beautiful, tender, harrowing... [ The Great Believers] is a vivid, passionate, heart-wrenching story." —Wall Street Journal

“Compulsively readable…a relentless engine mowing back and forth across decades, zooming in on subtlest physical and emotional nuances of dozens of characters, missing no chance to remind us what’s at stake.” —San Francisco Chronicle

“At turns heartbreaking and hopeful, the novel brings the first years of the AIDS epidemic into very immediate view, in a manner that will seem nostalgic to some and revelatory to others…Makkai''s sweeping fourth novel shows the compassion of chosen families and the tension and distance that can exist in our birth ones.” Library Journal

"Sure to become a classic Chicago novel…a deft, harrowing novel that’s as beautiful as its cover.” — Chicago Review of Books

“The latest novel from the stunningly versatile Makkai…Focused on a group of friends, lovers, and family outcasts, the book highlights the way tragic illness shifts the courses of people’s lives—and how its touch forever lingers on those left behind.” Harper’s Bazaar

“A devastating contemplation of love and loss…evokes the epidemic''s horrors, yes, but also the profound acts of generosity it sparked.” Oprah.com, “O’s Top Books of Summer”
 
“Deeply moving…Makkai does an excellent job of capturing the jaded, ironic and affectionately jibing small talk of a group of cultured gay friends in the Reagan era…[Captures] a group of friends in a particular time and place with humor and compassion. Conversations among her gay male characters feel very real — not too flamboyant, not too serious, always morbidly witty. It''s hard not to get drawn into this circle of promising young men as they face their brutally premature extinction.” —Newsday
 
“Two distinct narratives intertwine ingeniously…The stories meet up to heartbreaking effect.” —New York Magazine
 
“A poignant, historical journey through a virus’s outbreak and legacy.”— Conde Nast Traveler
 
“Rebecca Makkai’s beautiful (literally—look at that cover!) novel takes us to an art gallery in Chicago at the height of the AIDS crisis. From Chicago to Paris, THE GREAT BELIEVERS is a sweeping story of multi-generational trauma and the solitude that the AIDS epidemic created, as an entire generation was decimated by the virus.” —Fodor’s Travel

"With its broad time span and bedrock of ferocious, loving friendships, [ The Great Believers] might remind readers of Hanya Yanagihara’s  A Little Life…though it is, overall, far brighter than that novel. As her intimately portrayed characters wrestle with painful pasts and fight to love one another and find joy in the present in spite of what is to come, Makkai carefully reconstructs 1980s Chicago, WWI-era and present day Paris, and scenes of the early days of the AIDS epidemic. A tribute to the enduring forces of love and art, over everything." —Booklist (starred review)

“To believe in something is to have faith, and Makkai dispenses it fiercely, in defiance of understandable nihilism and despair—faith in what’s right, in the good in others, in better outcomes, in time’s ability not to heal but to make something new.” —National Book Review

“Another ambitious change of pace for the versatile and accomplished [Rebecca] Makkai… her rich portraits of an array of big personalities and her affecting depiction of random, horrific death faced with varying degrees of gallantry make this tender, keening novel an impressive act of imaginative empathy. As compulsively readable as it is thoughtful and moving: an unbeatable fictional combination.” Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

About the Author

Rebecca Makkai is the author of The Borrower, The Hundred-Year House, which won the Novel of the Year Award from the Chicago Writers Association, and Music for Wartime. Her work has appeared in The Best American Short Stories, Harper''s, and Tin House, among others. She lives outside Chicago with her husband and two daughters.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1985

Twenty miles from here, twenty miles north, the funeral mass was starting. Yale checked his watch as they walked up Belden. He said to Charlie, “How empty do you think that church is?”      Charlie said, “Let’s not care.”     

The closer they got to Richard’s house, the more friends they spotted heading the same way. Some were dressed nicely, as if this were the funeral itself; others wore jeans, leather jackets.      It must only be relatives up at the church, the parents’ friends, the priest. If there were sandwiches laid out in some reception room, most were going to waste.     

Yale found the bulletin from last night’s vigil in his pocket and folded it into something resembling the cootie catchers his childhood friends used to make on buses—the ones that told your fortune (“Famous!” or “Murdered!”) when you opened a flap. This one had no flaps, but each quadrant bore words, some upside down, all truncated by the folds: “Father George H. Whitb”; “beloved son, brother, rest in”; “All things bright and”; “lieu of flowers, donatio.” All of which, Yale supposed, did tell Nico’s fortune. Nico had been bright and beautiful. Flowers would do no good.     
The houses on this street were tall, ornate. Pumpkins still out on every stoop but few carved faces—artful arrangements, rather, of gourds and Indian corn. Wrought iron fences, swinging gates. When they turned onto the walkway to Richard’s (a noble brownstone sharing walls with noble neighbors), Charlie whispered: “His wife decorated the place. When he was married. In ’72.” Yale laughed at the worst possible moment, just as they passed a gravely smiling Richard holding open his own door. It was the idea of Richard living a hetero life in Lincoln Park with some decoratively inclined woman. Yale’s image of it was slapstick: Richard stuffing a man into the closet when his wife dashed back for her Chanel clutch.     

Yale pulled himself together and turned back to Richard. He said, “You have a beautiful place.” A wave of people came up behind them, pushing Yale and Charlie into the living room.     

Inside, the decor didn’t scream 1972 so much as 1872: chintz sofas, velvety chairs with carved arms, oriental rugs. Yale felt Charlie squeeze his hand as they dove into the crowd.     

Nico had made it clear there was to be a party. “If I get to hang out as a ghost, you think I wanna see sobbing? I’ll haunt you. You sit there crying, I’ll throw a lamp across the room, okay? I’ll shove a poker up your ass, and not in a good way.” If he’d died just two days ago, they wouldn’t have had it in them to follow through. But Nico died three weeks back, and the family delayed the vigil and funeral until his grandfather, the one no one had seen in twenty years, could fly in from Havana. Nico’s mother was the product of a brief, pre-Castro marriage between a diplomat’s daughter and a Cuban musician—and now this ancient Cuban man was crucial to the funeral planning, while Nico’s lover of three years wasn’t even welcome at the church tonight. Yale couldn’t think about it or he’d fume, which wasn’t what Nico wanted.   

  In any case, they’d spent three weeks mourning and now Richard’s house brimmed with forced festivity. There were Julian and Teddy, for instance, waving down from the second-story railing that encircled the room. Another floor rose above that, and an elaborate round skylight presided over the whole space. It was more of a cathedral than the church had been. Someone shrieked with laughter far too close to Yale’s ear.     

Charlie said, “I believe we’re meant to have a good time.” Charlie’s British accent, Yale was convinced, emerged more in sarcasm.     

Yale said, “I’m waiting on the go-go dancers.”     

Richard had a piano, and someone was playing “Fly Me to the Moon.”      What the hell were they all doing?     

A skinny man Yale had never seen before bear-hugged Charlie. An out-of-towner, he guessed, someone who’d lived here but moved away before Yale came on the scene. Charlie said, “How in hell did you get younger?” Yale waited to be introduced, but the man was telling an urgent story now about someone else Yale didn’t know. Charlie was the hub of a lot of wheels.   

 A voice in Yale’s ear: “We’re drinking Cuba libres.” It was Fiona, Nico’s little sister, and Yale turned to hug her, to smell her lemony hair. “Isn’t it ridiculous?” Nico had been proud of the Cuban thing, but if he knew the chaos his grandfather’s arrival would cause, he’d have vetoed the beverage choice.   

Fiona had told them all, last night, that she wasn’t going to the funeral—that she’d be here instead—but still it was jarring to see her, to know she’d followed through. But then she’d written off her family as thoroughly as they’d written Nico off in the years before his illness. (Until, in his last days, they’d claimed him, insisting he die in the suburbs in an ill-equipped hospital with nice wallpaper.) Her mascara was smudged. She had discarded her shoes, but wobbled as if she still wore heels.     

Fiona handed her own drink to Yale—half full, an arc of pink on the rim. She touched a finger to the cleft of his upper lip. “I still can’t believe you shaved it off. I mean, it looks good. You look sort of—”     

“Straighter.”     

She laughed, and then she said, “Oh. Oh! They’re not making you, are they? At Northwestern?” Fiona had one of the best faces for concern Yale had ever seen—her eyebrows hurried together, her lips vanished straight into her mouth—but he wondered how she had any emotion left to spare.     

He said, “No. It’s—I mean, I’m the development guy. I’m talking to a lot of older alumni.”     

“To get money?”   

“Money and art. It’s a strange dance.” Yale had taken the job at Northwestern’s new Brigg Gallery in August, the same week Nico got sick, and he still wasn’t sure where his responsibilities started and ended. “I mean, they know about Charlie. My colleagues do. It’s fine. It’s a gallery, not a bank.” He tasted the Cuba libre. Inappropriate for the third of November, but then the afternoon was unseasonably warm, and this was exactly what he needed. The soda might even wake him up.     

“You had a real Tom Selleck thing going. I hate when blond men grow a mustache; it’s peach fuzz. Dark-haired guys, though, that’s my favorite. You should’ve kept it! But it’s okay, because now you look like Luke Duke. In a good way. No, like Patrick Duffy!” Yale couldn’t laugh, and Fiona tilted her head to look at him seriously.   

He felt like sobbing into her hair, but he didn’t. He’d been cultivating numbness all day, hanging onto it like a rope. If this were three weeks ago, they could have simply cried together. But everything had scabbed over, and now there was this idea of party on top of everything else, this imperative to be, somehow, okay. Merry.   

And what had Nico been to Yale? Just a good friend. Not family, not a lover. Nico was, in fact, the first real friend Yale had made when he moved here, the first he’d sat down with just to talk, and not at a bar, not shouting over music. Yale had adored Nico’s drawings, would take him out for pancakes and help him study for his GED and tell him he was talented. Charlie wasn’t interested in art and neither was Nico’s lover, Terrence, and so Yale would take Nico to gallery shows and art talks, introduce him to artists. Still: If Nico’s little sister was holding it together this well, wasn’t Yale obliged to be in better shape?   
 Fiona said, “It’s hard for everyone.”

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
2,942 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Judith Sutton
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Heartbreaking
Reviewed in the United States on June 23, 2018
I did not want this book to end. I live in Chicago, and of course knew all the places but on a personal note I moved to San Francisco in 1987 to do AIDS education. 6 months after moving there my brother was diagnosed with AIDS and died Jan 27th, 1990. The descriptions of... See more
I did not want this book to end. I live in Chicago, and of course knew all the places but on a personal note I moved to San Francisco in 1987 to do AIDS education. 6 months after moving there my brother was diagnosed with AIDS and died Jan 27th, 1990. The descriptions of the disease, the bedside vigils were spot on. This book was amazing. I loved how she tied the early years of the epidemic with the Paris story and how Fiona could channel her anger. I am wrung out. Please read this book.
217 people found this helpful
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Phelps Gates
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A handful of dust
Reviewed in the United States on July 7, 2018
This is really two novels under the same covers, told in alternating chapters. One is terrific, the other one only OK. The terrific one takes place in Chicago''s Boystown during the worst days of the AIDS catastrophe. The characters are sympathetic and believable, though... See more
This is really two novels under the same covers, told in alternating chapters. One is terrific, the other one only OK. The terrific one takes place in Chicago''s Boystown during the worst days of the AIDS catastrophe. The characters are sympathetic and believable, though flawed in many ways, and the author makes us both wonder about what their fate will be and care about it. If you were in Chicago at that era, you''ll probably find it especially interesting, but I related to it even though I''ve never set foot in the Windy City. The OK novel takes place 30 years later in Paris, with a mother searching for her daughter who is alienated and fleeing a cult. I confess that I found her adventures somewhat hard to identify with, though the story would appeal to anyone with maternal instincts. The protagonist here is Fiona, who was the sister of a man who died of AIDS in the other half; a few of the chacters appear in both parts, but mostly in minor roles, and (except for Fiona) are not well developed. The author is a master of storytelling and kept me turning the pages, but I think I''d have enjoyed this more if I''d just read the odd-numbered chapters, though there is a heart-rending scene at the very end that''s worth waiting for.
91 people found this helpful
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Owl
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good...
Reviewed in the United States on August 21, 2018
The book is interesting - probably more so for those directly and indirectly involved in the crisis - personally I read it in two days due to interest. I''d recommend that the author include footnotes to explain some of the colloquialisms and references of homosexual life.... See more
The book is interesting - probably more so for those directly and indirectly involved in the crisis - personally I read it in two days due to interest. I''d recommend that the author include footnotes to explain some of the colloquialisms and references of homosexual life. I''m very educated on HIV and the AIDS crisis and even I had to look up a few of the slang terms used.

What I particularly like about the book - I hope the author reads this - is when Nora is talking about our memories being a sort of time travel. Aging is difficult, loss is even harder, but the one positive is that the older we get and the more we see, the more memories we have to delve into and enjoy. Those times that I''m alone or unhappy, I can always remember the extraordinary times in my past. That makes me feel like the luckiest person in the world. Thank you.
78 people found this helpful
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Jessica Sullivan
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A sprawling intimate novel that''s dense but rewarding
Reviewed in the United States on July 12, 2018
This sprawling, intimate novel takes on the legacy of the AIDS crisis, focusing on one group of friends in Chicago in the 1980s. It’s 1985 and Yale Tishman’s friends are dying one by one. As his career at a Chicago art gallery begins to take off, his personal... See more
This sprawling, intimate novel takes on the legacy of the AIDS crisis, focusing on one group of friends in Chicago in the 1980s.

It’s 1985 and Yale Tishman’s friends are dying one by one. As his career at a Chicago art gallery begins to take off, his personal life is consumed with loss—not to mention the looming fear of getting sick himself. Yale throws himself into a new project, helping the aunt of one of his late friends Nico unveil a collection of paintings from famous 1920s artists that she once knew.

The novel jumps between 1985 to 2015, where Nico’s sister Fiona, once the caretaker of her brother and his friend as they slowly succumbed to AIDS, attempts to track down her estranged daughter. Fiona has spent her entire adult life burdened by grief, hesitant to get close to anyone.

Makkai does a wonderful job of weaving together these two timelines, revealing not only the urgency and devastation of the AIDS crisis as it was unfolding, but the lasting legacy for those who were touched by it.

This is a dense novel that demands careful attention. At times it’s slow, but it’s rewarding—especially toward the end as key connections are made between Fiona and Yale’s narratives, forming the whole picture like a newly restored painting. It’s not as deeply emotional as I expected for a book with such heavy subject matter—due in part perhaps to the dual timelines. That said, the especially poignant passages feel earned. Every now and then a particular sentence would strike me hard.

There are families we’re born into a families we choose. Love that ends abruptly and love that lasts a lifetime. The Great Believers is about all of that, about the bonds we form and the people in our lives who make us who we are.
68 people found this helpful
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Claire Hargis-Hattendorf
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A poorly written false account of the ravages of AIDS in the 1980''s.
Reviewed in the United States on August 30, 2019
Not only is this book poorly written, it is factually inaccurate. I worked as a registered nurse in San Francisco during the 1980''s, and the HIV situation was not even close to the description written in this back. There is basically no plot, just lumped of negative... See more
Not only is this book poorly written, it is factually inaccurate. I worked as a registered nurse in San Francisco during the 1980''s, and the HIV situation was not even close to the description written in this back. There is basically no plot, just lumped of negative experiences among different lovers, families, and ''friends''.
Don''t waste your money, send it to the New York Times, so they will keep it on the Best Sellers List.
45 people found this helpful
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M. Gottlieb
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Well-Told Story About A Time We Shouldn''t Forget
Reviewed in the United States on July 13, 2018
Michael Cunningham''s review in the NYT was spot-on: this is a beautifully-written novel that captures its different characters through the most descriptive little details, and I grew to care about every single one. For anyone who wants to better understand how HIV/AIDS... See more
Michael Cunningham''s review in the NYT was spot-on: this is a beautifully-written novel that captures its different characters through the most descriptive little details, and I grew to care about every single one. For anyone who wants to better understand how HIV/AIDS decimated communities, and how those communities were ostracized and feared, it is a poignant telling. I''m very glad I read it and would highly recommend it as a compelling, well-crafted summer read.
52 people found this helpful
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Danielle Babiarz
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lived it (kinda.) Illuminating history.
Reviewed in the United States on September 18, 2018
I lived in Boystown at the time this story was taking place. I can remember walking by the Melrose Cafe (one of the places mentioned in the book) and seeing a big group of men sitting outside--emaciated, some in wheelchairs, some with ports in their arms. It struck me then,... See more
I lived in Boystown at the time this story was taking place. I can remember walking by the Melrose Cafe (one of the places mentioned in the book) and seeing a big group of men sitting outside--emaciated, some in wheelchairs, some with ports in their arms. It struck me then, for the first time, that this really was an epidemic. Entire social networks; for some, entire support systems gone. But I still didn''t grasp the enormity of this horrible illness until I read this book. I gulped the whole thing down in three days. The narrative jumps back and forth between Chicago in the mid-80s through the early 90s following a group of gay men, describing the pathos of the time and Paris in 2015 describing the aftermath. There''s a good bit of irony here; and heartbreak. Young men who had finally found a place where they could really be who they were, where it was actually celebrated, are hit with the blackness and despair that comes with a plague. I was struck by the sadness of it; the unfair-ness of it.

That said, the writing is a little trite, downright cringeworthy in some places. Characters (with the exception of the main protagonist) are shallow, even stereotypical. This is the reason I gave it only three stars. Overall, however, definitely worth a read. It changed my perspective on the matter, and as stated above, I lived at ground zero when it was taking place.
29 people found this helpful
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SnapJudgment
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent, layered, elegant, intelligent, bold, subtle; tragic & hopeful
Reviewed in the United States on August 17, 2018
This is a really excellent book. It tells a messy, human story in elegant language, layering its themes lovingly. I consider myself extraordinarily lucky to be alive at a time when Rebecca Makkai is publishing fiction; she is a master storyteller, intelligent, bold, and... See more
This is a really excellent book. It tells a messy, human story in elegant language, layering its themes lovingly. I consider myself extraordinarily lucky to be alive at a time when Rebecca Makkai is publishing fiction; she is a master storyteller, intelligent, bold, and subtle.

Others have noted how painstakingly Makkai researched -- and how accurately it seems she has represented -- AIDS and the gay community in 1980s Chicago. I think it''s also worth noting how well she represents visual art, university development, and 2015 Paris. The details that provide the background and plot of this novel help make its characters real, which in turn helps me as a reader care about the protagonists.

The Great Believers draws its two primary protagonists very well, and distinguishes them both from each other and from the well-sketched ensemble players. It was easy to identify with these characters, even (perhaps especially) in their imperfections.

This novel is at once tragic and hopeful. Makkai writes with deceptively simple language that packs a punch in the protagonists'' every triumph and loss. Things are so well constructed that with seemingly a single sentence, the reader feels the impact of a glance, a death, even one person telling another he''s inferior.

I hesitate to criticize anything in this novel because it''s so well crafted that I suspect anything I perceive as a shortcoming will become another rewarding layer upon a second reading. I''m eager to read this novel again.
26 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Amazonian Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Thoughtful and engrossing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 12, 2019
The Great Believers is an engrossing novel set in two time frames with alternating chapters. The first timeline takes us back to the mid eighties in Chicago and is told from the perspective of a young gay man, Yale Tishman. Happily settled in a long term relationship with...See more
The Great Believers is an engrossing novel set in two time frames with alternating chapters. The first timeline takes us back to the mid eighties in Chicago and is told from the perspective of a young gay man, Yale Tishman. Happily settled in a long term relationship with journalist and activist Charlie, his art gallery job is flourishing. Thanks to a tip off from a friend he is hoping to discover some previously unknown works from famous artists. Juxtaposed with this success though is the horror of the AIDS epidemic. One by one his friends in their close knit community start to succumb to this terrible disease. The second strand follows Fiona, 30 years later trying to track down her estranged daughter Claire. Fiona''s brother Nico was one of the first of Yale''s friends to die from AIDS. Watching so many of her friends suffer and die has left Fiona with emotional scars and contributed to the breakdown of her relationship with Claire. The two strands twine together and tie up beautifully in the final chapter. It''s an absorbing, often sad, but also frequently joyful read.
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Editor Plus
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Astonishing book, and very haunting
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 15, 2019
A great read - 1980s Chicago during the AIDS crisis - well researched and poignant.
4 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good look at the aids crisis in the 80s
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 11, 2019
This book allowed me to learn more about the 80s and HIV and AIDS and the awful struggle for acceptance that the gay community had to go through in America. The charcaters were flawed as real humans and had heart. I did not find it a particularly uplifting story as led to...See more
This book allowed me to learn more about the 80s and HIV and AIDS and the awful struggle for acceptance that the gay community had to go through in America. The charcaters were flawed as real humans and had heart. I did not find it a particularly uplifting story as led to believe, but it was entertaining. I liked the shift in time frames, and it opened discussions with people who lived through the 80s. I felt the start of the book was stronger than the end and I personally wanted to know more about Claire, as I found it hard to care about her as she came across unlikable after growing to care for Fiona so much.
One person found this helpful
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Aftiti
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Couldn''t put it down
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 12, 2020
This is not a perfect book, but it is difficult to put down and very engaging. I felt that the stories of the main male characters were quite obvious and cliched, but it didn''t spoil the overall read for me.
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Robert
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Heartbreaking and affecting
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 18, 2020
Heartbreaking and affecting this is a stunning read which manages to draw individual characters rather than relying on stereotypical images of gay men in 80s America. It paints a picture from the very beginning of the AIDS crisis whilst also involving us in the search for a...See more
Heartbreaking and affecting this is a stunning read which manages to draw individual characters rather than relying on stereotypical images of gay men in 80s America. It paints a picture from the very beginning of the AIDS crisis whilst also involving us in the search for a daughter and and the exploration of an artistic legacy. I loved this book.
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