new arrival The Colors of All the Cattle: wholesale No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (19) (No. 1 2021 Ladies' Detective Agency Series) outlet sale

new arrival The Colors of All the Cattle: wholesale No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (19) (No. 1 2021 Ladies' Detective Agency Series) outlet sale

new arrival The Colors of All the Cattle: wholesale No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (19) (No. 1 2021 Ladies' Detective Agency Series) outlet sale

Description

Product Description

In this latest installment of the beloved and best-selling No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, Precious Ramotswe finds herself running for office—much to her dismay.
 
When Mma Potokwane suggests to Mma Ramotswe that she run for a seat on the Gaborone City Council, Mma Ramotswe is at first reluctant. But when she learns that developers plan to build the flashy Big Fun Hotel next to a graveyard, she allows herself to be persuaded. Her opponent is none other than Mma Makutsi’s old nemesis, Violet Sephotho, who is in the pocket of the hotel developers. Although Violet is intent on using every trick in the book to secure her election, Mma Ramotswe refuses to guarantee anything beyond what she can deliver; hence her slogan: “I can’t promise anything—but I shall do my best.”
 
Meanwhile, Mma Ramotswe has acquired a new client: one of her late father’s old friends, who was the victim of a hit-and-run accident. Charlie volunteers to be the lead investigator in the case to prove he’s ready to be more than an apprentice, as well as to impress a new girlfriend. With Charlie’s inquiries landing him in hot water and Election Day fast approaching, Mma Ramotswe will have to call upon her good humor and gen­erosity of spirit to help the community navigate these thorny issues, and to prove that honesty and compassion will always carry the day.

Review

Praise for The Colors of All the Cattle:


"Bears all the quiet weight [readers] expect before reaching a particularly appropriate ending."
Kirkus Reviews

"High comedy abounds." – Booklist

"Captur[es] the intimate rhythms of daily life in Botswana–and women in particular–in wise, gentle prose." – Entertainment Weekly

About the Author

ALEXANDER McCALL SMITH is the author of the No. 1 Ladies'' Detective Agency novels and a number of other series and stand-alone books. His works have been translated into more than forty languages and have been best sellers throughout the world. He lives in Scotland.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

CHAPTER ONE

PICKED UP BY THE WIND AND BLOWN AWAY

Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni, owner of Tlokweng Road Speedy Motors, and one of the finest mechanics in Botswana, if not the finest, was proud of his wife, Precious Ramotswe, progenitor and owner of the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency. Many men are proud of their wives in one way or another, although not all of them are as vocal in their pride as their wives might like them to be. This is a failing of men, and must be added to the list of men’s failings, although all of us have failings and weaknesses—men and women alike—and it is not always helpful to point them out.
 
But of Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni’s pride in Mma Ramotswe there could be little doubt. Sometimes, for instance, he would just gaze at her in silence and think, There is no other lady quite like Mma Ramotswe in all Botswana. That thought alone filled him with pride, just as much as it was a comfort to him. To think that of all the women in the country she should have come into his life—that was a humbling realisation, and reminded him of just how great a role chance plays in our human existence. It could so easily have been otherwise: she might have decided not to go out on that fateful day on which they had met. She might have gone elsewhere, encountered somebody else altogether, and married that somebody else. And yet she had not. They had met, and after a great deal of anxious hesitation he had eventually plucked up enough courage to ask her to be his wife. And she—oh, heaven-sent good fortune—had agreed.
 
As to his pride, there were so many reasons for this. Mma Ramotswe was a fine- looking woman, a woman of traditional build, a woman of sound and sensible views, a woman who embodied all that was praiseworthy in the national character. Yet she was also human. She was reluctant to condemn other people for not being quite as good as they might be. She was not one to expect unattainable standards. She understood that many of us would like to be better in our personal lives but somehow could not seem to achieve it. She recognised that sometimes the best we could do was simply to muddle through, get­ting some things right but also getting many things wrong. She knew all that, and was never too quick to blame or offer reproach.
 
She was kind; she was forgiving. She did not think that people should be punished too severely for their actions, as long as they acknowledged that what they had done was wrong. If you punish some­body harshly, she said, then you are simply inflicting more pain on the world. You are also punishing not only that person, but his family and the people who love him. You are punishing yourself, really, because we are all brothers and sisters in this world, whether we know it or not; we are all citizens of the same village.
 
He liked her ability to exercise forgiveness, but there were other qualities that explained the pride he felt in her. One of these was the fact that she was a good cook—not necessarily one of the very best cooks in the country, but certainly somewhere in the top ten percent. Being a good cook, he thought, was not something that could necessarily be taught. You could watch other cooks, you could study recipes and experiment with new ways of doing things, but that did not necessarily mean that you would become a good cook. Being a good cook was not dissimilar to being a good mechanic—you had to have a feeling for what you were doing, and that was something that you either had or you did not. He thought of his two apprentices, Charlie and Fanwell. Fanwell had a feeling for engines—he sympathised with them; it was as if he knew what it felt like to be in need of an oil change or to be labouring under the disadvantage of ill-fitting piston rings. Charlie, for all his bluster and his bragging, never really had that. An engine could be telling him something as plainly and as unambiguously as it could, but he would fail to pick up the unmissable signs of distress. And then, when the inevitable mechanical failure occurred, rather than trying to understand what signs had been over­looked, he would bully the engine. There was no other word for it: he would bully it by removing bolts and nuts brutally; he would rip out a fuel hose, an engine’s crucial aorta, rather than coaxing it gently off its nozzle; he was not even averse to applying a hammer blow here and there in the hope of shifting some mechanical log-jam within the engine block.
 
Fanwell was much more gentle. At a very early stage in his training he had grasped the need to listen to what a vehicle was saying. He understood that at heart engines wanted to oblige us; it was their destiny to fire properly and to run sweetly for as long as their owner wished. Engines knew that, and, if only you treated them correctly, they would do your bidding. But hit an engine, or subject it to any of the other cruelties that thoughtless owners could devise, and the engine would become as stubborn as a mule.
 
It was the same, Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni thought, with cooking. If you were gentle, if you blended ingredients together gently, folding them in with all the delicate care of a mother tucking a child into bed, then they would co-operate. If you took the trouble to understand what temperature cooking oil liked, then it would seal the beef perfectly or soften the onions to just the right consistency. If you tasted a soup regularly, adding salt and pepper pinch by pinch rather than all at once, then the result would be perfectly seasoned rather than too salty or too hot. This was an art, he was convinced, and it was one to which Mma Ramotswe seemed to have been born.
 
Of course, instruction was required. Children might be endowed at birth with the instincts of a good cook, but this inherent talent still had to be nurtured through tuition. Usually it was the mother who did this teaching, and usually it was the daughter who learned, but these days, much to Mma Ramotswe’s delight, boys were at long last being encouraged to cook. Puso, their foster son, had already learned at school how to make a number of dishes, and, even if his efforts so far had not proved universally edible, at least some were. He was proud of his ability and beamed with pleasure when Mma Ramotswe told him how much she appreciated his custard with jam or his only slightly burned sausages served with soggy fried potatoes. Of course, there were certain traditionally minded people, some of them curmudgeons by instinct, who thought it wrong that boys should be taught to cook, but these people were out of touch with the modern world and their opinions no longer needed to be given much weight. And this came rather close to home—at first, Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni himself had been doubtful as to the appropriateness of teaching boys to cook, but he had soon been set right on that by Mma Ramotswe.
 
“Do men eat?” she asked him one day.
 
He looked up, surprised. “Of course men eat, Mma. Everybody must eat.”
 
She nodded. “I agree with you, Rra. Men like to eat—some men like it a lot.”
 
“In particular,” said Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni, “they like to eat meat. Men are very keen on eating meat.”
 
“That is true, Rra. Men seem to need meat. And if you need to eat, then I would have thought you need to be able to cook—even if you are a man.”
 
They exchanged glances. He was not sure where this conversation was going, but he detected in it an element of gentle reproach.
 
“Mind you,” he ventured, “there are some men who do not eat meat. They’re called vegetables.”
 
Mma Ramotswe laughed. “Vegetarians, Rra.”
 
He looked puzzled. “Yes, vegetarians. That’s what they’re called.”
 
“You said they were vegetables.”
 
“Did I? Then I was wrong, Mma. I meant to say vegetar . . .” He stumbled on the word.
 
“Vegetarians.”
 
“Yes, that. There is a vegetarian here in Gaborone who drives an old Land Rover. He lives out near the Sanitas Garden. They say that he has never eaten meat in his life—even when he was a boy.”
 
Mma Ramotswe smiled. “I think that man is a Hindu. They are like that as a matter of belief. They think that cows are sacred.”
 
Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni could go some way towards sympathising with that—cows were special, there was no doubt about that—but he was not sure whether he would go so far as to consider them sacred.
 
“He is a very gentle person, that man,” he went on. “But his Land Rover is very old and I think it’s losing heart. You can always tell when a vehicle loses heart.”
 
“He should get a new one.”
 
Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni smiled. “I told him that. I said that there were some very smart new Land Rovers. But he just shook his head and said that his Land Rover was an old friend and he would not desert it. That is an attitude that I can understand, Mma.”
 
Mma Ramotswe knew what he meant. She felt that same thing about her tiny white van. She had resisted his attempts to change it for a more modern version—well- intentioned attempts, yes, but nonetheless misplaced.
 
“This man with the Land Rover,” Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni continued, “he is very weak, I think. Not weak in his mind, but in his body, Mma. He looks as if the wind could blow him over if it ever tried. You know that look? There are some people who seem to be at real risk from the wind.”
 
“He is getting on a bit,” said Mma Ramotswe. “He is almost as old as his Land Rover—maybe even older.”
 
“It’s not age,” said Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni. “I think it might be lack of meat, Mma. If he ate some good Botswana beef, then he would be stronger. If you eat Botswana beef, then you will never be blown away by the wind.”
 
For a moment they were both silent. Mma Ramotswe was remem­bering something. A long time ago she had been told a story—it was one of those stories you heard as a child—this one about two children who had been picked up by the wind and blown out into the Kala­hari. They had wandered about in that dry land for days and had just been about to succumb to thirst when they had been met by a band of San people. These hunters had taken them in and shown them where their water was hidden. They had empty ostrich shells buried under the sand and these were filled with precious water. They had saved the lives of those two children and had kept them with them for years, looking after them because they had no idea where the wind had picked them up and where they might return them to. Eventually the children had grown and, because they were not San people, who are short, they had towered over their rescuers. What had happened then? She could not remember. She thought that it had been decided to send them back to their Batswana roots because you cannot take tall people on the hunt—the animals will see you and will run away. Someday she would have to find out what happened.
 
She looked at Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni. This view—that men had to eat meat—was an old-fashioned one, but she doubted whether she would ever be able to get her husband to see that. Some beliefs were very deeply ingrained, and, although you could expect men to make some adaptations, they were not always capable of making themselves entirely modern. Another thing was certain, too: she would never succeed in converting him to vegetarianism, even had she wished to do so. That would take centuries, and none of us had centuries; which was fortunate, in a way, at least for men, because most men, if they lived for centuries, would be centuries out of date at the end of their time, and that would be insupportable, she thought, for their wives, and possibly for others too. If Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni had, as he undoubtedly did have, this high opinion of Mma Ramotswe, and if, as was certainly the case, he thought that there was no respect in which she could possibly be improved, she did not share this view of herself.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Mr. Orlando R. Barone
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The No. 1 Ladies Are Back in Form
Reviewed in the United States on January 23, 2019
After a couple of lackluster entries to the long-running "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" series, Mma Ramotswe, Mma Makutsi, and Mma Potokwane, and Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni return with an enlivened plot and a few welcome twists. Precious Ramotswe, Botswana''s favorite and perhaps... See more
After a couple of lackluster entries to the long-running "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" series, Mma Ramotswe, Mma Makutsi, and Mma Potokwane, and Mr. J.L.B. Matekoni return with an enlivened plot and a few welcome twists. Precious Ramotswe, Botswana''s favorite and perhaps its only woman detective, embarks on a quest to find the hit and run driver of a car that struck a revered doctor from her childhood, and she gets unlikely help from Charlie, the mechanic still figuring out how to change an oil filter.

The sub-plot with Charlie, now 26, is poignant and layered. It enriches the book as the young man falls hard for the beautiful and well named Queenie-Queenie, who, it appears, is far out of the league of the apprentice mechanic and detective. She''s not only gorgeous but from a very rich family; her well-toned brother is also highly protective and capable of causing bodily harm in any number of horrifying ways. Meanwhile, Charlie''s rather effective detective work roots out the hit and run driver, an amoral thug likewise willing to bring the hapless young man to perdition. His travails and triumphs flesh out a newly interesting character.

Meanwhile Mma Potokwane has decided, and therefore it will happen, that Precious will run for the equivalent of City Councilwoman in order to stop the development of a shady hotel (brothel?) way too close to a sacred graveyard. Of course, the always menacing Violet Sephotho lurks in the background of this nefarious scheme, as she always seems to lurk when the adjective "nefarious" applies. Interestingly, Violet is talked about but never appears in the story. Mma Makutsi''s botched detective work has no effect, and it is left to Mma Ramotswe to win the day by running against the formidable Violet.

One sour note is hit here. Mma Ramotwe is featured in the voting booth staring at the ballot adorned with her name — and Violet''s — making the election no longer theoretical but a frightening reality. Her inner agony at the prospect of voting for herself and her ultimate choice found me deeply disconcerted, even distraught. This was not the Precious Ramotswe I''ve come to know 19 volumes in. This is of course a personal reaction; others may perceive the scene quite differently.

All in all, however, the resolutions are satisfying and beautiful Botswana emerges once again a jewel in the African firmament. Contentment descends upon our beloved residents as they go about repairing cars, selling couches, embracing orphans, and, of course, solving the inscrutable mysteries that will never withstand the transcendent sleuthing skills of the No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency.
22 people found this helpful
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Jersey Girl
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A little off his game
Reviewed in the United States on November 11, 2018
I love MMA Romotswe and all her friends. I love the descriptions of Botswana, the cattle, the sky, the landscape and the lives of the people who live there. And, generally, I love these novels, but this one felt forced and a little off. The ending came quickly,... See more
I love MMA Romotswe and all her friends. I love the descriptions of Botswana, the cattle, the sky, the landscape and the lives of the people who live there.

And, generally, I love these novels, but this one felt forced and a little off. The ending came quickly, as if the author had found something more important to do and just wanted it finished. I would never want these novels to end, but perhaps Mr. McCall Smith needs to take a bit of a break and recharge his Botswanan reserves.
22 people found this helpful
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SueAnn Joplin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book series
Reviewed in the United States on November 7, 2018
I really like this series of books. They are a light read and are not inundated with sex, violence and foul language.
18 people found this helpful
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G. James
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another enjoyable treat from McCall Smith
Reviewed in the United States on October 5, 2018
Fans of the No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency will not be disappointed with Book 19 in the series. "The Colours of all the Cattle" rekindles our relationship with the lovable characters of the book as well as the easy going life in Botswana. This volume introduced the... See more
Fans of the No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency will not be disappointed with Book 19 in the series. "The Colours of all the Cattle" rekindles our relationship with the lovable characters of the book as well as the easy going life in Botswana. This volume introduced the fascinating new prospect of Mma Ramotswe as a politician! Heaven forbid! But it all works out as it should, and we wait in anticipation for Book 20.
17 people found this helpful
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Marion Marchetto, author
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An Honest Politician?
Reviewed in the United States on January 21, 2019
“I can’t promise anything—but I shall do my best.” This is the campaign slogan that Mma Precious Ramotswe uses in her bid for a seat on the Gaborone City Council. She is doing this against her better judgement, having been coerced into the political arena by her friends... See more
“I can’t promise anything—but I shall do my best.” This is the campaign slogan that Mma Precious Ramotswe uses in her bid for a seat on the Gaborone City Council. She is doing this against her better judgement, having been coerced into the political arena by her friends Mma Potokwane, Mma Makutsi, and Rra Polopetsi. Her husband has wisely decided not to offer his opinion.

Of course there is the concern about a greedy land developer who wants to build the Big Fun Hotel next to a graveyard where most people believe those who have passed would consider it a dishonor. The deciding factor is her opponent, Violet Saphotho, who is the arch-enemy of Mma Makutsi (now Joint Managing Director of the No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency). Violet is running unopposed and is sure to win if Mma Ramotswe doesn’t give her competition. It is Mma Makutsi herself who learns through solid detective work the Violet is conspiring with the land developer; she is willing to take a bribe in order to vote in favor of the hotel.

When a case of hit and run surfaces from Mma Ramotswe’s hometown of Mochudi, it is handled by the new assistant detective in training – Charlie. Readers of the series will recall Charlie as something of a ladies man, as well as having been an apprentice in the motor shop. But in this installment Charlie is beginning to mature and finds himself in love with a young woman of means. He laments his former lifestyle and mourns the time he squandered instead of learning a trade. He is determined to be a good assistant detective.

In their own style, the characters who populate this book are not only old friends to many readers but also are a laid back commentary on life. I thoroughly enjoyed The Colors of All The Cattle. In this, the nineteenth book of the series, we see our friends begin to evolve as they reflect on life and their part in it. Another hit for the prolific Alexander McCall Smith. Great book to cuddle up with on a cold winter night or a warm beach day.
5 people found this helpful
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Lois Fisher
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Too Slow
Reviewed in the United States on November 16, 2018
The No. 1 Ladies'' Detective Agency novels are never fast moving, but they usually draw you in with the charm of the characters, the light mystery, and Botswana. I''m sorry to report that this entry drags on. Getting Precious involved in local politics goes nowhere, and is... See more
The No. 1 Ladies'' Detective Agency novels are never fast moving, but they usually draw you in with the charm of the characters, the light mystery, and Botswana. I''m sorry to report that this entry drags on. Getting Precious involved in local politics goes nowhere, and is boring. The best thing about this book is the chapter concerning the "fight" between Grace and Phuti. I laughed because Grace gets on everyone''s nerves, and it was fun to see her husband finally stand up to her. The secondary story concerning Charlie would have been better if cut down; it went on forever. For all the complaints, I still look forward to the next story in the series.
10 people found this helpful
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JRAlpine
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A traditionally built lady who tells the truth
Reviewed in the United States on November 14, 2018
In “The Color of All the Cattle,” readers will again encounter the human decency that makes Alexander McCall Smith’s No.1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series endearing and popular. As always, the plot sidles as much as it advances, Smith’s characters speculating... See more
In “The Color of All the Cattle,” readers will again encounter the human decency that makes Alexander McCall Smith’s No.1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series endearing and popular.

As always, the plot sidles as much as it advances, Smith’s characters speculating volubly on an eccentric range of topics, most (but not all) relevant to the story. The major action involves Mma Ramotswe’s unlikely campaign for the Gaborone City Council, but this book belongs to Charlie, a part-time investigator in her agency long employed as a mechanic by her husband. The bad boy of the series begins to grow up and the transformation is beautifully rendered.

But there’s humor too, of course. A manifesto Mma Makutsi writes to attack her arch-enemy Violet Sephotho is worth the price of admission.

In fact, the book is so good that a comparatively limp conclusion seems more a blemish than a flaw. True, an important plot line is left unresolved. But we’re all going to read the next book anyway. And the next, and the next.
2 people found this helpful
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Cristina Pescaru
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Annoying
Reviewed in the United States on January 9, 2019
It may be just me, but I find Mma Makutsi''s attitude extremely grating. And the fact that Mma Ramouswe allows it, even more so. Encouraging arrogance doesn''t help anyone in the long run. Another thing that kinda soured the book for me is the "modernization" of a... See more
It may be just me, but I find Mma Makutsi''s attitude extremely grating. And the fact that Mma Ramouswe allows it, even more so. Encouraging arrogance doesn''t help anyone in the long run.
Another thing that kinda soured the book for me is the "modernization" of a traditional culture. Of course, nothing stays the same, but part of what I loved about it was the wisdom of traditional culture and the calm understanding of the world that Mma Ramouswe brought to us. It was a breath of fresh air and sanity in a world getting crazier by the minute. Now we all have to be social justice warriors, and women have to bash the men. I thought we had enough of that in the world at large.
I agree with the reviewers that complain about the characters becoming merely stereotypes and cartoon villains. We know nothing about Violet except that Mma Makutsi hates her, which being that that lady''s personality is pretty questionable itself is not much of a recommendation, and that she is snarky.
I''m disappointed in this last installment. If this continues, I may have to say goodbye to the No 1 Ladies Detective Agency
4 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Amazon Customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Falling under on the stereotype
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 22, 2018
I''ve loved these books and have fond memories of Africa when I read them. I''m finding that the author has become more and more embroiled in the "frivolous thought patterns" that only dotted the early books. Now, much of the writing is banal, simplistic internal mutterings...See more
I''ve loved these books and have fond memories of Africa when I read them. I''m finding that the author has become more and more embroiled in the "frivolous thought patterns" that only dotted the early books. Now, much of the writing is banal, simplistic internal mutterings that are virtually incoherent and, quite honestly, boring. I''m struggling to read this book...the first time I''ve encountered this throughout the whole series. Pity really.
15 people found this helpful
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Tabby
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not a patch on previous books
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 30, 2019
I have read and loved all the ladies detective stories but this one was boring, devoid of an entertaining story, verging on the ''preachy'' regarding Britain and Botswana''s past, with a few digs here & there, Mma Makutsi''s character has become very irritating & this has...See more
I have read and loved all the ladies detective stories but this one was boring, devoid of an entertaining story, verging on the ''preachy'' regarding Britain and Botswana''s past, with a few digs here & there, Mma Makutsi''s character has become very irritating & this has changed the tone of the book for me, This book seems to have been churned out at the demand of the publisher, a huge money spinner for the author no doubt but it is tired and has lost it''s gentle humour, sadly the joy has gone.
5 people found this helpful
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Stevew07
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another delightful read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 11, 2018
Every book in this series is an unbelievable wonderful read. The characters are amazing and the cases solved in a practical, and often, unusual way. The stories are interwoven with beautiful descriptions of Botswana which obviously the author loves. Whilst this series is...See more
Every book in this series is an unbelievable wonderful read. The characters are amazing and the cases solved in a practical, and often, unusual way. The stories are interwoven with beautiful descriptions of Botswana which obviously the author loves. Whilst this series is now in it’s 19th novel they can be read individually. I cannot praise the style of writing of Alexander McCall Smith highly enough, it’s gentle, humorous , and delightful.
9 people found this helpful
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Virginia H.
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Disappointing
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 20, 2019
Disappointing. Like other reviews I''ve read I found the endless philosophising boring. I''ve lived in Africa for many years so was delighted to read the first books and enjoyed the plots. However, now all we get is pages of thoughts and very little action, and what action...See more
Disappointing. Like other reviews I''ve read I found the endless philosophising boring. I''ve lived in Africa for many years so was delighted to read the first books and enjoyed the plots. However, now all we get is pages of thoughts and very little action, and what action there is has become a bit far fetched. I''m really sorry, I love Mma Ramotswe but perhaps she needs a rest now.
5 people found this helpful
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judith wharton
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
not up to scratch
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 19, 2019
Ive read ever one of the ladies detective agency but this one was so so disappointing pages full of nothing made me think hes just trying to fill the pages. The story line was so poor I am so short on money right now and really had to toss up should i treat myself I must...See more
Ive read ever one of the ladies detective agency but this one was so so disappointing pages full of nothing made me think hes just trying to fill the pages. The story line was so poor I am so short on money right now and really had to toss up should i treat myself I must say it was as struggle to carry on reading sorry to be so negative
3 people found this helpful
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